AD&D Save v. Normal Fires

5 posts / 0 new
Last post
Myke
Joined: 2015-10-22 00:25
AD&D Save v. Normal Fires

After my first read of the core book I could have very well overlooked the info I seek, But, if something in AD&D calls for a save v. Normal Fires, how would that convert to ACKS? (note Idon't know how it worked, what save to use, in AD&D either). Also, I'm assuming save v. magical fires would be Spells?

Thanks

Lucasdelsur
Joined: 2015-05-05 18:43

i will say save vs blast

Dave
Patreon SupporterDomains At War BackerSinister Stone of Sakkara BackerLairs And Encounters BackerBarbarian Conquerors of Kanahu BackerACKS Heroic Fantasy Handbook Backer
Joined: 2013-03-17 15:23

I believe normal and magical fires both refer to item saving throws rather than character saving throws; they're separate things in AD&D.  Item saves have a chart on page 80 of the DMG, with numbers based on material rather than class or level.  For normal fires, numbers are in the 2 to 5 range for most materials, but 13 for cloth and 18 for parchment/paper.

I understand the idea is that targets who fail a save versus fireballs, lightning bolts, acid or just flaming oil also then check to see if their gear made it.  Magic items get a bonus, and metal has good numbers to begin with, so individually your odds are good, but over time it takes magic items back out of play, and makes players think twice about fireballing everyone they meet. 

I don't know that ACKS did copy over AD&D's item saves, unless I'm missing it somewhere.  So either use the DMG numbers or just assign a chance of "stuff catching on fire" and roll.  But I would say ACKS' character save numbers are too high to use, especially at low levels.

Aryxymaraki
Aryxymaraki's picture
Patreon SupporterDomains At War BackerSinister Stone of Sakkara BackerLairs And Encounters BackerBarbarian Conquerors of Kanahu ContributorACKS Heroic Fantasy Handbook Contributor
Joined: 2014-01-04 02:20

This post is correct. To my knowledge, ACKS does not use item saving throws.

If you want to know whether or not something catches fire, use your judgement as a Judge, or figure out a percentage chance and then roll some dice. (There's always the old 50% rule if you have no idea; anything you have no clue what the chance is, it's a 50/50 shot.)

Myke
Joined: 2015-10-22 00:25

Ah, that all makes a lot of sense. Thank you for all the info, it's greatly appreciated.